UNICEF: More than 97,000 teachers and staff in Yemen's schools receive cash incentives

Amman- Sanaa (Debriefer)
2019-03-11 | Since 2 Month

اضغط هنا لقراءة الخبر بالعربية

The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) said on Sunday that teachers and school-based staff are required to go through a verification process as a pre-condition for payment. The first payment cycle has reached more than 97,000 of the intended teaching professionals.

Geert Cappelaere, UNICEF Regional Director for the Middle East and North Africa said in statement seen by "Debriefer" News Agency: "UNICEF has started paying incentives aiming to reach over 136,000 teachers and school-based staff in Yemen who have not received a salary in over two years, helping to keep children in school and learning."

He said: "Teachers and school-based staff are required to go through a verification process as a pre-condition for payment."

He added: "The situation of Yemen’s education sector is daunting. One in five schools in Yemen can no longer be used because they are damaged or being used in the fighting or to shelter displaced families."

Cappelaere confirmed that "the incentives from UNICEF offer eligible teachers and school-based staff a monthly payment equivalent to US$50 in local currency so that they can continue teaching and help prevent more children from dropping out of school."

He explained that "the scheme covers staff in over 10,300 schools and will benefit an estimated 3.7 million children."

Civil servants in rebel-held areas are still unpaid, except for those working for revenue-generating agencies, said the analysts slamming Hadi government for failure to fulfill promises it had made to the UN, WB and IMF two years ago when it had decided to move CBY.

In September 2016, Yemeni President Abd Rabbu Hadi issued a controversial decree, moving the Central Bank of Yemen headquarters from the national Houthi-held capital of Sana'a to his temporary capital of Aden.

The decision left some million civil servants unpaid for more than two years, most residing in the heavily populated north, aggravating the livelihood and human sufferings.

The legitimate government accused the Houthis of draining the central bank and spending the country's foreign exchange reserves of $4.7 billion on their war effort. Moreover, it accused the Houthis of putting their fighters and people they have appointed in public institutions on the payrolls, an accusation the Houthis deny.

The UN official said: "Out of 7 million school-aged children, over 2 million children are already out of school. School infrastructure is badly damaged and learning materials are in short supply. "

"One in five schools in Yemen can no longer be used because they are damaged or being used in the fighting or to shelter displaced families.", he added.

Yemen has been racked by an armed conflict that broke out after the Iranian-backed Houthis had ousted the internationally recognized government late in 2014, leaving tens of thousands killed, hundreds of thousands injured, and 3 million displaced.

The conflict escalated after a Saudi-led coalition intervened militarily in the country in March 2015 to reinstate the government of President Hadi, triggering the world's worst humanitarian crisis, according to the UN, with most of the population in need for a type of humanitarian aid and immediate protection, including 8.4 million people unsure how to get next meal, and some 2 million children suffering severe shortage of nutrition.


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