Yemen's parliament calls on "legitimate" gov.t to sever ties with Houthi-supporting countries

Seyoun (Debriefer)
2019-04-18 | Since 6 Month

 

اضغط هنا لقراءة الخبر بالعربية

Yemen's parliament on Tuesday called on the Yemen's internationally recognized government to sever ties with pro-Houthi countries and not hold any new consultations before implementing the Stockholm Agreement.

The proposed bill's articles by the parliament state that Houthi movement and everyone affiliate to in its different components, structures, bodies and committees, civil and militiamen or paramilitary or identified by security characteristics all are considered to be a terrorist group.

Yemen has been racked by an armed conflict that broke out after the Iranian-backed Houthis had ousted the internationally recognized government late in 2014.

Saudi Arabia has been leading a military coalition in Yemen since 26 March 2015, in support of forces loyal to President Hadi to retake areas controlled by Houthi group seen as proxy for Iran in the Arabian Peninsula country.

Parties to the over 4-years old war in Yemen, after 8-day peace talks in Sweden, reached on the 13th of last December an agreement providing for ceasefire in Hodeida and redeployment of both sides' forces, exchanging prisoners and alleviating blockade imposed by Houthis on Taiz.

But none of this has taken place so far, with both sides trading blames for trying to thwart the deal.

The port city of Hodeida and its three ports have been under Houthi control since late 2014, while Yemeni joint forces loyal to legitimate government and Arab coalition have massed at the city's fringes since last November seeking to retake the strategic port.

According to Aden-based "Saba" news agency the bill text states that everything committed by Houthis ever since the emergence of their militias and following taking control over the state's institutions by using weapons all are considered to be a terrorist acts and criminal actions under the Yemeni constitution and laws in effect that should be severely punished in accordance to the Yemeni Law of Crimes and Penalties.

The conflict has left tens of thousands killed, hundreds of thousands injured, and 3 million displaced, triggering the world's worst humanitarian crisis, according to the UN, with most of the population in need for a type of humanitarian aid and immediate protection, including 14 million people risking famine and some 1.8 million children suffering malnutrition.

 


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